A Couple Drinks a Day May Keep Dementia Away

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The International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease brought forth a number of findings from unique clinical studies. One of these findings was related to the protective effects of alcohol related to dementia. The study found that one or two drinks a day, and not any more than that, lessens the chances for older adults ages 75 and up to develop dementia. According to Kaycee Sink, MD, of Wake Forest University School in Winston-Salem, N.C, “Among cognitively normal older adults, one to two alcoholic drinks a day is associated with a 37% decreased risk of dementia over six years.” The moderate drinkers had a lower risk of dementia than those that did not drink alcohol at all and compared to individuals that drink more than two drinks a day. However, Dr. Sink was careful to point out that despite these findings, she does not recommended that anyone who is a nondrinker begin the use of alcohol to prevent dementia. She went on to say that patients who had been diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment were shown to function at lower levels cognitively with any amount of alcohol. According to Maria Carrillo, PhD, director of medical and scientific relations at the Alzheimer’s Association, “Physicians need to be clear with their patients exactly what is meant by ‘light,’ ‘moderate’ and ‘heavy’ drinking.” Click here to read an article from Medpagetoday that discusses this study more.

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