Childhood Vaccinations Reduce The Risk of Pediatric Strokes

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Source: James Gathany/CDC

Source: James Gathany/CDC

There may still be a misguided anti-vaccination group advising parents not to inoculate their children, but a new study shows yet again how positive vaccines are for childhood health. Not only do they prevent terrible diseases that can have permanent effects, but childhood vaccination can also reduce the risk of strokes.

USA Today explains that pediatric strokes are rare, with only five out of every 100,000 being affected. Co-author of the study Heather Fullerton says that amounts to roughly 5,000 pediatric strokes a year in the United States. Half of these strokes are the result of blood clots. Fullerton, a professor of neurology and pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego, focused on those blood clot-related pediatric strokes in her study.

The study found that children who received “some, few, or no” vaccines were nearly seven times more likely to have a stroke than kids who had all or most of their recommended vaccinations, according to the report presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference in San Diego.

Research had previously shown that infections are a common cause of pediatric strokes by creating temporary increases in blood clotting. Many of these clots are created by vaccine-preventable bacterial diseases, which can lead to meningitis, an inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord.

Vaccines have been called on of the greatest modern medical successes, and are responsible for eliminating multiple deadly and life-altering diseases from the developed world. It is sad to see a contemporary push back against vaccinations based on false information when we are still finding ways they improve the modern way of life.

Fullerton and her colleagues presented the work in abstract form at the conference, as it has yet to be published as a full paper in a peer-reviewed journal.

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