Emotional eaters struggle more with weight loss

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Weight loss is difficult. Finding a balance between exercise and diet is a complicated science to say the least. However, exercise and diet are not the only factors to consider with regards to weight loss. The psychology of weight loss is a predominate factor in creating a successful weight loss plan.

A recent study published by Heather Niemeier and colleagues at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University revealed that weight loss is much more difficult for “emotional eaters.” The study reported that emotional eaters both have more difficulty in losing weight and in keeping it off. The study focused on a group of 286 overweight participants who were subjects in a behavioral study and another group of 3,300 adults that had lost at least 30 pounds and were able to keep it off for a least a year. The following is an excerpt of an article from Reuters that reviews the study:

“We found that the more people report eating in response to thoughts and feelings, the less weight they lost,” Heather Niemeier, an obesity researcher at The Miriam Hospital and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, said in a statement.

“Amongst successful weight losers, those who report emotional eating are more likely to regain,” said Niemeier, whose study appears in the journal Obesity.

The study included 286 overweight men and women who were participating in a behavioral weight loss program.

A second group consisted of more than 3,300 adults who have lost at least 30 pounds and kept it off for at least one year.

Niemeier and her team analyzed responses to an eating inventory questionnaire.

They focused on people who ate because of external influences, such as people who eat too much at parties, and people who ate because of internal influences, such as feeling lonely or as a reward.

Click here to read the entire article from Reuters

Click here for information on Brookhaven’s programs for eating disorders

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