Off-premise alcohol outlets create greater risks of injury among neighborhood children

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According to the results of a new study, which will be published in the November issue of Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, off-premise alcohol outlets create greater risks of injury among neighborhood children. According to the study, neighborhood children who live near off-premise alcohol outlets are more susceptible to injury because of overall lack of guardianship related to alcohol consumption, which leads to increase in child injuries. According to Bridget Freisthler, assistant professor in the department of social welfare at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), “Neighborhood areas with high levels of social disorganization can make the children who live there more vulnerable to injury in a number of ways.” The following is an excerpt of an article from Medical News Today that reviews findings from the study:

“Impoverished and disorganized neighborhoods may present more physically dangerous environments,” said Freisthler. “Limited social capital restricts their ability to respond to social problems that might endanger children’s health and well being. Reduced levels of social control may facilitate risky behaviors, such as playing in dangerous streets or vacant buildings. And, areas that have fewer adults available to monitor and supervise children’s activities may further exacerbate problem behaviors.”

“One’s neighborhood environment determines the number and type of risks a resident of a particular neighborhood will be exposed to,” agreed Richard Scribner, D’Angelo Professor of Alcohol Research at the Louisiana State University School of Public Health. “This study supports the conceptual model that views the neighborhood environment as an essential component in contributing to population health.”

Freisthler and her colleagues analyzed aggregate data collected for the year 2000 on populations and environments in 1,646 California zip code areas, examining connections with numbers of hospital discharges for childhood injuries from accidents and assaults, and injuries related to child abuse.

Click here to read the rest of this article from Medical News Today

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