Violence against women increases health risk worldwide

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According to researchers from the World Health Organization, male-partner violence against women is a good sign of the victim’s poor personal health. The study looked at a sample of 20,000 women from Asia, South America, and Africa, surveying their current health and their lifetime instance of abuse by men either physically or sexually. The results revealed that women who reported any type of abuse were more likely to be in poor health, to have attempted suicide, or to have had, within the last 4 weeks, pain, memory loss, dizziness, difficultly walking, or vaginal discharge. The following is an excerpt of an article from Journal Watch that reviews the study:

Intimate partner violence (IPV) against women is alarmingly common and widely understood to be a risk factor for both mental and physical problems. However, most research in this area has been conducted in developed countries and in clinical rather than community populations, has used small samples, has not used standard definitions of violence, and has not controlled for confounders. Therefore, the World Health Organization sponsored a methodologically rigorous, population-based survey of 24,097 women (age range, 15–49; 97% of those eligible) at 15 rural and urban sites in 10 countries in South America, Africa, and Asia.

Click here to read the rest of this article from Journal Watch

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