Where You Live May Affect Your State Of Mind

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In recent years reports of mental distress are increasing. A study published online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine reported that 10.2% of adults in America possessed frequent mental distress from 2003 to 2006. These numbers have increased from reports of frequent mental distress at 9% from 1993 to 2001. According to Matthew M. Zack, M.D., M.P.H, of the division of adult and community health at the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues, the lowest frequency of mental distress was found among Hawaii residents at 6.6%; the highest frequency of mental distress was found in Kentucky at 14.4%. The researchers commenting on the findings said that states with large urban populations “…tend to reflect the prevalence in those areas due to their sheer numbers, potentially obscuring the detection of high or low prevalence in less-populated areas of the state.” The study examined results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System analysis, which surveyed 2.4 million adults.

I can only image what effects our current economic crisis will have on this analysis as more data becomes available. Click here to read an article from CNN.com that discusses the findings more.

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